Exhibitions

The Fellowship of Professional & Amateur Artists holds an annual summer exhibition, when FPAA members are invited to submit examples of their work for public display and appraisal by an external assessor.

Since 2007 entries to the FPAA's annual exhibition have been judged by David Rafer BA (Hons), PhD.

2013 Summer exhibition

Over 150 entries were displayed at this year's summer exhibition, which was held at Wellingborough Museum. During the week 830 people visited the show, 13 sales were made and several new members enrolled

As well as providing constructive feedback in his review of the exhibition, David singled out a number of works for special mention, commendation and awards.

Download David Rafer's review of the exhibition

Awards and commendations

Best in Show

         
Winner
Clifford Knight for No. 58, ‘Ruined Church, Segenhoe’ (oil).
  Runner up
Robert Pearce for No. 99, ‘Breaking Wave, Southwold’ (oil on canvas).

Visitors' Choice

         
John Black for 'The River Nene at Ditchford' (oil).   This painting was completed in just over one hour at a public demonstration in Rushden on 17th November 2012.

The accompanying poem was written by Peter Phelps who - along with many others - was present.
   
THE PAINTING DEMONSTRATION

The large black canvas stood at centre stage
with sombre surface lifeless, easel-high.
waiting to accept the artist's vision
and be transformed into another world.

The gifted artist, armed not only with
his simple tools but (far more precious)
memory, skill and opportunity
together with abandonment of time.

Then Richard Strauss was added to the mix
to start the journey. Not to target fixed
but allowing each bold mark to offer
suggestions as to where the next should be.

Before our eyes the shapes and colours formed
and changed and grew into their various roles.
Making us see beyond the chemistry
and into sunset, river, hill and trees.

This was no photo-view - mechanical,
describing all and leaving nothing out.
But transformation (as the canvas hoped)
Not only of the medium but ourselves.

Brought to this place by some mysterious means
An introduction to the spirit of the place.
And all who made this journey surely sensed
That we had shared a rare experience.

We thank you, John

Prizes

The Patricia Glen Memorial Prize
Christine Fitch for No. 33, ‘Hollyhocks’ (watercolour).

The Peter Jenkyns Memorial Prize
Peter Phelps for No. 104, ‘At the Recital’ (acrylic).

The Vivien Schofield Memorial Prize
Jean Daker for No. 26, ‘Pheasants in the Snow’ (oil).

The Celia Hanbury Memorial Prize
Ros Smith for No. 120, ‘Awareness’ (watercolour).


Best in category

Best 3D
Stella Benford for ‘Darling Buds of May’ (ceramic).

Best Textile
Dorothy McGuire for No. 73, ‘Art Nouveau Poppies’ (embroidery and stumpwork).

Best Mixed Media
Angela Melhuish for ‘Anemones’ (ex. catalogue).

Best Portrait
David C Hunt for No. 46, ‘The Explorer’ (pastel).

Best Pastel
David A Hunt for No. 44, ‘The Flour Mill’ (pastel).

Best Watercolour
David Miles for No. 83, ‘Geese on Floodwater’ (watercolour).

Best Acrylic
Jill Smith for No. 117, ‘Fuchsias’ (acrylic).

Best Oil
Brian Mutton for No. 89, ‘But Winter and Rough Weather’ (oil on board).


Highly Commended

   
Graham Plant No. 107, ‘Lorna’ (pastel)
Ian Luck No. 62, ‘Reading Chair’ (watercolour and pen)
Allan McIntosh No. 76, ‘Irrawadi Sunset - Connectivity’ (acrylic)
Ray Roadnight No. 112, ‘Life’ (oil)
Jacqui Tomlin No. 132, ‘Winter River Landscape’ (mixed media)
Pat Bustin No. 19, ‘Grey Skies, Burnham Overy Staithe’ (acrylic)
Lin Hunt No. 47, ‘Romeo’ (oil)
Sue Lydia Taylor No. 130, ‘Still Life’ (oil)
Linda Walton No. 137, ‘Willow’ (acrylic)

Commended

   
Carol Woodland No. 149, ‘Shade-giving Vines’ (chalk pastel)
Brenda McKetty No. 81, ‘Waiting for the Tide’ (acrylic)
Maureen Lynn No. 66, ‘Glimpse of Fruit’ (oil)
Hazel Britton No. 16, ‘Mumbles Head’ (watercolour)
Juliet Illsley No. 50, ‘Clematis’ (watercolour)
Shirley Smith No. 122, ‘Peaceful Retreat in the High Country, Australia’ (acrylic)
Mick Watson No. 142, ‘Rajhastan Woman’ (acrylic)

 

 

 

Back to Top